Tag Archives: Local Words

Word of the Week

belter:

Any of a wide range of things seen as exceptionally good, excellent or cool:

“The baw landit at his feet an’ he hit it a belter.”
“Who was that wee belter ye were chattin’ up there?”
“Yer new motorbike’s a belter!”
“Ah landed tickets tae the concert fur cheap! Ya pure belter!”

Hear it.

See last week’s (posted late) edition, it’s a pure belter.

Thanks to a new reader, Laura K. for the suggestion!

Word of the Week

oot scoot:

A phrase of dismissal, usually said to children who are in the speaker’s way:

“Here, let me in that cupboard weans. Oot scoot, beat it!”

This probably comes from a children’s game in which players are eliminated in turn by means of a chant ending “oot scoot, you’re oot.”

Word of the Week

stupit-lookin:

An abusive objective, popular among those who prefer not to swear:

“Gaun, ya stupit-lookin daft big clown, ye!”

Word of the Week

ton weight:
A term applied to anything, including people, considered to be very heavy:
 
“It’s time that wean was walkin’, she’s a ton weight.”

Word of the Week

well:
Used in the sense of ‘in that case’, this turns up at the end rather than the beginning of statements:
“Are ye no wantin’ that sausage?  Gie it tae me, well.”

Word of the Week

feartie:
A disparaging term for a cowardly or nervous person:
“The water’s no even cold, ya bunch a fearties.”

Word of the Week

miss:
To miss yourself is not to somehow become aware of the absence of your body, but to fail to experience something enjoyable through not being in the right place at the right time:
“Ye missed yersel no comin on Saturday…it wis a right good night.”
If you are angry with someone and are telling a third party exactly what you will do when you catch the offender, you might say Ah’ll no miss him or, in its fuller form, Ah’ll no miss him an’ hit the wa’.

Word of the Week

storm damage:
A local version of ‘a few slates missing’, i.e. an implication that someone is not right in the head:
“Ah wouldnae pay too much attention to what he tells ye.  There’s a fair bit of storm damage there.”

Word of the Week

bug ladders:
Sideburns, the cheeky implication being that the wearer is infested:
“How’d ye no just let yer bug ladders grow thegither an’ cry it a beard?”

Word of the Week

doll:
An affectionate term of address for a woman or girl:
“How’s it gaun doll, all right?”
An old doll is an elderly lady, particularly someone’s mother:
“She’s nicked up tae see her auld doll.”
glossary: nicked up – taking a quick visit.